Income Disparities for the Elderly Affect their Health and Quality of Life

Economic conditions and income inequality in the United States have been a heavily debated topic over the past several decades, especially since the post-recession economy has further made the most wealthy in the U.S. more wealthy, and has drastically decimated the wealth of the middle class and the poor. Perhaps no other population has been affected more than the elderly, who have seen significant increases in financial inequality.… [Read more]

Boise, Idaho: The Blue City in a Decidedly Red State

Often, the political dilemma in the United States of America seems double-sided. The bipartisan system domineered by Democrats and Republicans has the potential to oversimplify the context of the political climate, making it seem like individuals and states are majorly one or the other.

However, as with any human issue, the truth is not painted in black and white.… [Read more]

Planning for How Tax Changes Will Affect You

Tax law changes relatively often. Major tax reform is rare, but rules and regulations, especially at the state level, have a tendency to fluctuate, and this can mean that you see slightly different results in your tax returns from year to year. For example, in 2018 a number of IRS filing changes took effect, including a much larger standard deduction and a lower mortgage interest deduction.… [Read more]

Protecting the Elderly From Scams & Financial Abuse

You hear the story over and over again: an elderly person scammed out of their retirement by a family member or acquaintance. As one of our more vulnerable groups, the elderly are constantly targeted by the predators of our society because they’re lonely or easy to confuse. It’s a sad state of affairs, especially among a people so easy to manipulate.… [Read more]

Workplace Diversity and Inclusion: An Update

Diversity has been a dialogue in the U.S. for decades. In 1920, women were given the right to vote nationally, after almost a century of protests for suffrage. Up until the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation was legal across the country, which held up standards of exclusion that permeated American culture across all classes.

This was a little over 50 years ago, and although we are getting closer to equal human rights, the effects of centuries of sexism and racism will continue to influence those in power for decades to come.… [Read more]

Have Urbanization and Gentrification Gone Too Far?

The classic American Dream is has become nearly unachievable in the modern U.S. With the dismantling of labor groups and unions, the idea that someone can work hard and live a comfortable life while supporting a family after learning a trade is far-fetched. Even those who obtain a college education and enter the workforce with a degree are saddled with unprecedented debt, crippling their long-term earning potential.… [Read more]

The Fight for Our Children’s Right to a Free and Equitable Education

Children are the future of our society. If we want smart, accomplished citizens who can make informed decisions, start wonderful businesses, and create a fantastic future, we need to invest in them. It doesn’t matter if that child is born to parents who are impacted by poverty or to parents who are wealthy and can afford a world-class education.… [Read more]

Navigating Justice-Based Career Options in Broken Systems

The desire to help those less fortunate than ourselves is part of the fundamental nature of humanity. Yet it has unfortunately fallen to the wayside in recent years, if the prison-industrial complex, conspicuous lack of affordable medical care, and flawed foster care system are any indication.

The good news for those who want to address inequality without perpetuating broken systems is that you have plenty of options for turning your passion for social justice into a lucrative career.… [Read more]

The Problems Afflicting American Prisons

America’s prisons are grappling with a bevy of severe problems.

There are too many inmates, not enough guards, and the recidivism rate is disturbingly high. Criminal justice reform is one of the rare bipartisan issues that everyone agrees on. It doesn’t matter if you believe that the police are arresting too many people or if you think that aren’t enough people behind bars.… [Read more]

Education is Key to Lowering Recidivism Rates

Each year, there are a number of incarcerated adults who transition from the correctional system in the United States, returning to their families and communities. While many are able to successfully reintegrate into their lives before entering prison or jail, there are a number of people who commit new crimes and are reincarcerated. For marginalized populations, this is a particularly prevalent issue.… [Read more]

4 Different Strains of Cannabis & Their Positive Medical Impacts

In spite of the fact that it technically remains illegal in the vast majority of the world, cannabis has most definitely gone mainstream. Even though it remains illegal at the US federal level, more than 30 states have already legalized medical cannabis use and another nine states plus the District of Columbia have laws that allow for recreational use.… [Read more]

The Latest Report on The U.S. Infrastructure and Why the Current Solution Doesn’t Work

Anyone who has driven on a major interstate anywhere in the U.S. or across a bridge that is in dire need of repair, it may come as no surprise that the infrastructure in the United States needs a lot of help.

In 2017, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave America’s infrastructure a D+ in their report; the ASCE releases a report card for the condition of the infrastructure every four years.… [Read more]

What Are the Real Consequences of the Fast-Growing Automotive Industry?

According to predictions, there will be 2 billion cars in use on the world’s roads by 2035.

With such a rapid increase in the number of vehicles and the recent shift in the automotive industries towards focusing on the environmentally friendly methods in power generation and manufacturing, will the continued impact remain the same, get worse or start to improve?… [Read more]

4 Things Big Cities Can Do to Clean up Their “Bad Side” of Town

One of the most prevalent theories in creating safer neighborhoods is the “broken windows theory” which suggests that cleaner and nicer looking neighborhoods deter crime. It’s a notion that’s been integrated into modern policing, but promoting responsible behavior is something the whole community needs to take part in. Healthy communities require vigilance and civic pride. These four tips for promoting safer neighborhoods draw deeply from the broken windows policy.… [Read more]

Japan’s First Plea Bargain Raises Questions, Comparisons

In the U.S., the majority of criminal cases are resolved via a plea bargain  — a practice that has been in place for decades. Plea bargains aren’t globally ubiquitous, however; Japan only introduced the method in June 2018 for matters involving bribery and/or organized crime, and the nation’s first case to be resolved via plea bargain made headlines in mid-July.… [Read more]

Will You Entrust Your Safety to a Flawed Gun Background Check System?

From the shooting at McKeesport, Pennsylvania on January 1, 2013, to the recent shooting at Parkland, Florida on February 15, 2018, the United States has experienced 1,624 mass shootings. On the average, that’s 4 or more people getting shot in one incident every 9 out of 10 days.

How can a developed nation experience such violence?… [Read more]

The Golden State Split Proposal: What the 3 Californias Could Offer

The bid to split California into three separate states has gained an incredible amount of traction over the last few months, and this measure will now officially be on the November ballot. While there is still quite a bit of speculation coming from all sides, many are excited about the possibilities. Here is a closer look at just a few of the changes that may happen if this measure is voted through.… [Read more]

Up Close and Personal with the Mexican Elections

This summer, I got the chance to work remote in Mexico. I am staying with my family in Guadalajara, a large city in the state of Jalisco. While I had been expecting to enjoy life in Mexico, including the food, the activities, and the company of my wonderful family, I had not realized until the week that I left that I would be there to witness an historic election.… [Read more]

The Great Student Loan Debate: Privatize Student Loans or Complete the Federal Takeover?

A political debate is raging when it comes to student loans. In 2010, then President Barack Obama signed legislation into law that ended a 45-year-old program offering federal subsidies to private lenders dealing federally-guaranteed student loans. The move left the U.S. Department of Education as the sole provider of federal student loans. Private lenders and banks continued to offer loans to students, but the old system was dead and left with a heavy emphasis on federal responsibility.… [Read more]

The Politics of Having a Place to Live

Most of us have met people who want to “keep politics out of it.” “It” in this case can be whatever they want — the workplace, school, church, relationships. In many cases though, those people are either on the beneficiary end of the political system or simply not affected by certain laws.

Politics become relevant for most of us when we become their target.… [Read more]