Enough is Enough

I am saddened by the massacre in Colorado, the anger has not surfaced yet, I am stunned, in mourning. I don’t think I know any of the victims but, for some reason, this senseless killing feels so personal; I feel like every person who was killed, shot at, wounded, scared shitless and terrorized was a friend, family member and loved one.

Maybe, that’s what it has to come to, maybe each time any person in America is the victim of gun violence, we need to take it personally as if they are our daughters, brothers, mothers, fathers, sisters and sons. Maybe, if we all share the pain, those whom are suffering and grieving will feel each and every other person in the country suffering along with them.

Source: National Institute of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics

Like a smoldering fire, embers sparkling with the new breath of life, the ever-growing knowledge that the number one terrorist threat to the safety and security of every citizen of America is not from any foreign land, but from the sale and distribution of guns in the United States is seeping into the consciousness of many — but still guns are as pervasive as ever, destroying the lives of 48,000 Americans a year. In the time it takes most of us to get ready for work 55 people will be killed by a gun. It took the killer in Colorado just minutes to kill 12 innocent Americans. In Chicago the week before, 12 Americans were killed by guns in a five-day period. The collateral damage to the family, friends and loved ones of someone killed in gun violence is uncountable. There are no other words of comfort that can even come close to slowing the pain surrounding the people left behind in the wake of the death of a loved one by gun violence.

Guns in America are the number one public safety issue in the land. One million people have died by guns in America since 1968. People just like you and me, or any other member of our family. People we wouldn’t know about unless they were members of our own immediate family. Many die in obscurity; unless they are the most famous or important their death is soon forgotten. In my life time, one President has been murdered, two national leaders killed, one President shot at and critically wounded, countless congressmen and other political leaders have been shot, maimed and assaulted by the sane and insane with a bloody gun.

After President Reagan was shot along with Jim Brady, the public was leaning towards common sense ways of reducing the number of deaths attributed to guns and gun violence. The Brady Bbll took assault rifles off the streets for a while, but a relentless NRA ‘Scare the Shit out of White People’ ad campaign and millions of dollars in campaign contributions to ever-so-greedy spineless politicians have whittled the Brady Bill and other anti-gun legislation to next to nothing.

The time has come to finally put in place national common sense gun control laws. This is a national issue. This is not an inner city issue. This is an issue that touches every American no matter where he or she lives. The politicians who believe more guns and less control is the answer don’t have to look into the eyes of a person who just lost a loved one in a hail of bullets; they sit in their ivory towers collecting reelection money from the NRA and the gun lobby like the greedy scumbags they are.
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Mike Scourby is pretty normal for a guy who grew up in Brooklyn. Well, it’s true, and that’s also the name of his blog. He’s a Yellow Dog Democrat currently living deep in a Red State but, as he told his kids, he’s moving back to Brooklyn at the first sign of a twang. Mike spends his time educating young minds to a Bluer state of mind.  From 1973-1984, Mike was a NY State Supreme Court Officer and from 1982-1884 he served as the Warden for the Manhattan Homicide Grand Jury at 100 Center St in Manhattan when NYC reached approximately 3500 homicides a year.