College Tuition Costs and You

College tuition costsPolitics has its hands in everything. It even affects college and who attends and who doesn’t. Schools are inherently biased about who they will and will not accept as admissions is a selectivity game. As a result, prospective college students often feel as though they must throw everything noteworthy about themselves in their applications and, still, there is a possibility that they won’t be admitted to their higher education institution of choice. Colleges and universities are picking and choosing who they accept, and many of there decisions seem to be based on how ‘diverse’ you really are. For better or for worse, politics has infiltrated colleges.

However, no matter if you get in to this school or that, or if your hair is red or blonde, or you swam in high school or studied theater arts, the overwhelming problem of all college students is still the same: tuition costs are rising at a phenomenal rate. This means that unless a student is financially well-off, he or she will most likely graduate with a large amount of debt. Student loans are a temporary fix in that they will enable students to finance their education — but, as is the case with any temporary measure, a permanent fix must replace it in the long-run. Eventually, students must repay the piled-up debt.

There are approximately 37 million people who have debt they accumulated in college and, for now, it seems like that number will continue to grow. Unless a solution is found at the federal level, the unchecked costs of tuition will continue to increase, as will student loan debt. Check out the Consolidated Credit infographic below to see just how much college tuition rates have skyrocketed over the past 70 years:

Before you get tied in a knot about the politics of who gets into college or not, get informed about finances. Learn how much it’s actually going to cost, and how you plan on paying for it. You’ll be glad you did.