Workplace Diversity and Inclusion: An Update

Diversity has been a dialogue in the U.S. for decades. In 1920, women were given the right to vote nationally, after almost a century of protests for suffrage. Up until the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation was legal across the country, which held up standards of exclusion that permeated American culture across all classes.

This was a little over 50 years ago, and although we are getting closer to equal human rights, the effects of centuries of sexism and racism will continue to influence those in power for decades to come.… [Read more]

Gender Politics in New Jersey: The Shape of Things to Come?

A story out of New Jersey likely has many in America wishing for a time machine – for an escape into a (hopefully) near future where we can put race, gender, and sexual politics behind us once and for all.

Rachel Pepe, a 13-year-old student at Thorne Middle School in Middletown, New Jersey, has been told by school officials that she will not be allowed to return to school if she continues to dress, and identify as, a girl.… [Read more]

The Woes of Discrimination in the Workplace

Often, employees feel powerless when faced with what they believe to be discrimination in the workplace. Out of fear of losing their jobs in the current economic climate, many people feel that they have no choice but to tolerate certain behaviors, including harassment, jokes, and coworker favoritism, among other sometimes difficult to prove forms of discrimination.… [Read more]

LGBT Rights and the Supreme Court

Much progress towards full LGBT rights was achieved last year; marriage equality was won in several states, bringing the total to nine (Maryland, Iowa, Maine, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Washington — as well as the District of Columbia). Additionally, a hate crimes law was enacted, “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” ended and, for the first time ever, a sitting President stated his full support for marriage equality and instructed the Department of Justice to stop defending the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) which was enacted in 1996.… [Read more]

Flying Solo

If we are ever going to break down the borders that exist between people, nobody should be subjected to second class citizenship.

Those who are honest will admit that, in many circumstances, people are treated differently based on their religious beliefs or lack thereof, racial or ethnic classification, and even their weight. But how much consideration, if any, is given to the discrimination to which single, unmarried people are subjected in this society?… [Read more]

Goodbye Herman Cain, I Shall Miss You!

Your 15 minutes of political fame as the black guy who almost became the anything-but-Romney-choice for the Tea Party are just about up.  It has been a bizarre horse race up until now — but I’m pretty sure Herman Cain, while still in the race for the Tea Party-backed nomination (hereafter referred to as TeaPublican), is not going to remain a top contender.… [Read more]