Civil Forfeiture and State-Level Cannabis Programs

It’s been almost 50 years since states began decriminalizing marijuana (Oregon was the first in 1973!), taking the law into their own hands as they recognized federal laws surrounding the drug would take a long time to change. More than two decades ago, California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medicinal use, another trend that swept across the U.S.… [Read more]

How to Incorporate More Environmental Consciousness Into Your Life

With the recent emphasis on the reality of climate change, many people are looking for ways to incorporate environmental consciousness into their daily lives. If you want to cultivate a more sustainable lifestyle in the wake of the 2018 UN climate change convention, there are several small changes you can easily incorporate into your life.… [Read more]

Planning for How Tax Changes Will Affect You

Tax law changes relatively often. Major tax reform is rare, but rules and regulations, especially at the state level, have a tendency to fluctuate, and this can mean that you see slightly different results in your tax returns from year to year. For example, in 2018 a number of IRS filing changes took effect, including a much larger standard deduction and a lower mortgage interest deduction.… [Read more]

Workplace Diversity and Inclusion: An Update

Diversity has been a dialogue in the U.S. for decades. In 1920, women were given the right to vote nationally, after almost a century of protests for suffrage. Up until the Civil Rights Act of 1964, segregation was legal across the country, which held up standards of exclusion that permeated American culture across all classes.

This was a little over 50 years ago, and although we are getting closer to equal human rights, the effects of centuries of sexism and racism will continue to influence those in power for decades to come.… [Read more]

Have Urbanization and Gentrification Gone Too Far?

The classic American Dream is has become nearly unachievable in the modern U.S. With the dismantling of labor groups and unions, the idea that someone can work hard and live a comfortable life while supporting a family after learning a trade is far-fetched. Even those who obtain a college education and enter the workforce with a degree are saddled with unprecedented debt, crippling their long-term earning potential.… [Read more]

Could Paulette Jordan Win The Gubernatorial Race in Idaho?

Many Americans may struggle to find Idaho on a map, but the state recently has been making news across the U.S. for its Democratic candidate for governor, Paulette Jordan. Not only would she become the first female governor of Idaho, if elected, but she would also become the first Native American governor in the history of the country.… [Read more]

Making the Case for Balance Between Conventional and Alternative Medicine

Do you know anybody, perhaps even yourself, who eschews traditional “Western” medical treatments for entirely natural ones? Perhaps this person has a lifestyle that involves an abundance on supplements, homeopathic remedies, and similarly alternative treatments?

Well, as excellent for one’s health as it is to choose a good balance of vitamins and minerals, to avoid taking unnecessary prescriptions, and to ingest natural and unprocessed foods, an over-reliance on or trust in all things “natural” can end up being a very poor decision for your health.… [Read more]

Renewable Energy Is on the Rise — and There’s Nothing You Can Do About It

Good news for the world: scientists who’ve discovered an enzyme that eats plastic have accidentally mutated it, making it stronger. This is great news, considering that our oceans are littered with plastics throughout. While there may not actually be a “giant Pacific garbage patch,” but without these enzymes, the chance that our race will someday face such a disaster is high, because plastics aren’t traditionally biodegradable.… [Read more]

Why Thousands Cross the US Mexico Border to Seek Affordable Health Care is Curbing Medical Bankruptcies

In 2013, an estimated 1,800 medical-related bankruptcy were filed a day. 2013 saw nearly 1,800,000 wives, husbands, kids, and other related family members were affected by these bankruptcies. The high cost of healthcare is the leading cause of bankruptcy, affecting more than 1 million families per year.

Healthcare has become so expensive that even those with health insurance may not be able to afford their $5,000 or $10,000 deductibles, as 57% of Americans have less than $1,000 in their savings.… [Read more]

American Anti-Intellectualism and Social Inequalities in the Age of Trump

We live in the age of Trump. What this means will vary from individual to individual, but for every person who thinks he represents straightforward business, there is another that believes he represents an affront to American intellectualism.

Perhaps it’s because of comments like this, spoken by Trump at a campaign rally in 2016:

“You know, I’ve always wanted to say this—I’ve never said this before with all the talking we all do, all of these experts, ‘Oh we need an expert’—the experts are terrible!”

Nicholas Baer, Harper-Schmidt Fellow in the University of Chicago’s Society of Fellows at the rank of Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Humanities, mentions as much in his article, “American Idiot: Rethinking Anti-Intellectualism in the Age of Trump.” He draws heavily upon the work of Tom Nichols, a book titled The Death of Expertise.… [Read more]