Why Democracy in the Middle East Could Be Doomed

Democracy, loosely defined as for the people by the people, has long been a fantasy of developed countries for the Middle-East and North Africa. Though it would be heart-warming to think that this goal is purely altruistic, this is not the case. There are economic motives to consider amongst many other variables which contribute to the pressing desire to spread democracy.… [Read more]

This is a Democracy

The 2012 elections are history and Barack Obama has been re-elected President of the United States. In winning, he pulled along three senate and one congressional seat, expanding the Democrats majority in the Senate and reducing the Republican majority by one in the House.

In President Obama’s outstanding victory speech, he mentioned how some had to endure voter intimidation, suppression and long lines to vote.… [Read more]

Democracy Is Still the Answer: Authoritarianism is not the cure for illiberalism

Even as a staunch supporter of democracy for all, I will concede this point I say anything else: democracy has some troublesome flaws. And currently some of those flaws have contributed to a disturbing trend in some Middle Eastern states—the trend of growing illiberal, Islamist political parties, organizations, and ideologies.

In Egypt the Muslim Brotherhood now holds substantial power, with the even more extreme Salafist party holding an unnerving amount of government positions as well.… [Read more]

Canadian Health Care – Lesson Two

SOCIALISM!!! For the Tea Party loonies, it is the maple leaf-shaped shadow, the dark spectre of Johnny Canuck that looms larger and ever southward to scare the living bejeezus out of the red staters, a foul-faced harbinger of American healthcare doom. Yer near and yet so far obedient scribe is certain the sad charade masquerading as contemporary US health care debate is driven by the eye-popping ability of the supposed pundits to twist and torture a simple concept beyond any sensible meaning.… [Read more]

Weekly Wrap – July 8, 2012

This week we celebrated the nation’s independence day so that brought us to thinking about where the nation was, how far it has to go and who holds the power in charting the course for the future. We talk about the politicians all the time but what about the voters? Though not monolithic, we generally know where Democrats and Republicans stand on the issues, but what about the Independents?  … [Read more]

Systemic Faults

Honestly, I wasn’t too surprised to hear that the Supreme Court upheld Arizona’s  “lemme see your papers” doctrine; such laws are completely constitutional, and, furthermore, illegal aliens are guaranteed precisely zero protections under the U.S. constitution. Also, we need to keep American jobs for Americans and Mexicans are a drain on our already-burdened social welfare system.… [Read more]

Borrowing from the Money Store

In case you aren’t painfully aware that the student loan situation has gotten terribly out of hand, consider this: the average college graduate owes $25,000 in debt—what do you say to someone in that situation? Add to this the sublime impossibility of finding a job (days and days spent, dozens of CVs sent out… it’s like a ritual of sorts) and the proliferation of unpaid, or “for credit/experience/exposure” internships, and moving back home to your parents seems like more of a dire necessity than a sensible decision.… [Read more]

Prohibitive Power

In The Brothers Karamazov, Ivan utters one jarring line which has been since quoted and re-appropriated almost as often as Dostoevsky’s epilepsy would manifest itself.

That introduction, you see, was utterly tasteless, much as the Wall Street Journal has, over the past few years, devolved into a vulgar organ for pink-faced men gurgling cholesterol and spewing intellectual shortcuts and claptraps.… [Read more]

Defrosting Democracy

In the wake of the economic crisis, Iceland’s economy was utterly decimated and proverbially screwed by the remainder of the Eurozone. Unlike its Mediterranean counterparts who bowed to German financial autocracy and appointed unelected technocrats, Iceland saw what may be remembered as the most successful democratic resurgence to come out of the global recession, now in its 5th year.… [Read more]

The Lesser of Two Evils, For the Best

Why is it that certain groups of voters seem to consistently vote against their own interests? The results of the Wisconsin recall seem to be quite the claptrap for all of us who hoped that the political great awakening, which, after all, started in Madison, would lead to something resembling measurable change. Scott Walker has held on, and though the Democrats have taken the house, the overhaul of repressive labor legislation seems now a pipe dream.… [Read more]