Breaking Political Branding

Politics aren’t as easy as the 1800s when you could ply your voters by providing enough booze to kill them and hope they hit your name on the ballot box. It involves complex branding and image control. There are degrees based around setting up a good political image. It’s a serious business.

The real question is how much of your vote is based around branding and not candidates?… [Read more]

The Cost of Grad School and Why Students are Rising in Numbers

It’s no secret that the cost of an undergraduate degree has continued to steadily climb in recent years. An undergraduate is considered the “minimum” for many white-collar jobs, so most students don’t look further. This growing cost has driven undergraduates to seek new avenues of improving their lifetime earnings, even though number of graduate degrees awarded has doubled since the 1980’s.… [Read more]

The Economic Frenzy Around Education

This is not a good time to be a young student according to skeptics within the US. Even with the unemployment rate down by noticeable percentage, college costs are still a daunting prospect. As people point the fingers at the education curriculum, we have students struggling still to land decent paying jobs after graduation. Ultimately that ends up leading them towards a carousel, which is a lot more daunting if they are stuck in debt from their college.… [Read more]

Mo’ Money, Mo’ Debt: Accounting 101 for Politicians

If children are our future, why is their commencement into adulthood a Sisyphean burden of student debt?

Both Republican and Democratic candidates have begun sprinkling policy specifics into their presidential campaigns, and addressing student loan debt has managed to earn some attention in between blustery rhetoric aimed at Trump, Obamacare, and choosing the best epithet for describing immigrants.… [Read more]

Good news for students…for now? Not so fast…

Awaiting President Obama’s signature is a bill that will reduce the costs of borrowing for millions of students.

Don’t get completely happy about it; the bipartisan legislation links student loan interest rates to the financial markets. This means that at current market rates, students obtain lower rates now but, once the economy improves, rates will tick upwards and in synch with market conditions.… [Read more]

Hand-to-Mouth, Paycheck to Paycheck

Yesterday it was reported that 76% of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. According to Bankrate.com’s survey reported by CNN, “Fewer than one in four Americans have enough money in their savings account to cover at least six months of expenses, enough to help cushion the blow of a job loss, medical emergency or some other unexpected event, according to the survey of 1,000 adults.… [Read more]

The next big financial bubble can be popped.

Education can be an individual’s or a nation’s greatest investment. We talk about the disparity between the  public education provided to students with fewer economic resources and those who have greater financial means. We also talk about gender differences in that young women are often steered away from  Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields of study.… [Read more]

Campaigning on College Grads’ Prospects

If you’re a regular reader of this site you know that education is a frequent topic. Though the nation’s economy is slowly improving, its current state — fueled in large part by the unwillingness of some of our elected officials to boost job prospects — has, in part, resulted in greater competition for jobs available to debt-saddled graduates.… [Read more]

Borrowing from the Money Store

In case you aren’t painfully aware that the student loan situation has gotten terribly out of hand, consider this: the average college graduate owes $25,000 in debt—what do you say to someone in that situation? Add to this the sublime impossibility of finding a job (days and days spent, dozens of CVs sent out… it’s like a ritual of sorts) and the proliferation of unpaid, or “for credit/experience/exposure” internships, and moving back home to your parents seems like more of a dire necessity than a sensible decision.… [Read more]

How The Rich Are Increasing Your Student Loan Debt

If you’re one of President Obama’s fifteen million Twitter followers, you may have seen his #dontdoublemyrates tweets lately. The controversy stems from the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007, which, among other things, reduced the fixed interest rates on newly originated subsidized Stafford loans for undergraduate students only, from 6.8% in 2007 down a sliding scale until they hit 3.4% in the 2011-2012 school year.… [Read more]