Some Senators get it, but some on the SCOTUS don’t: Voting Rights are Crucial

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand sent this e-mail today, hoping that the citizens of her state, and citizens around the nation, will take action:

The Supreme Court’s oral arguments on the Voting Rights Act begin today.

We have to speak up in support of this landmark civil rights act now. There’s no time for silence. Not when a strike to this civil rights law would cause serious harm to our democracy.[Read more]

Voting Rights and the SCOTUS

Election day is months behind us but the issue of voting rights has once again become a ‘hot topic’. Tomorrow, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Voting Rights Act case, Shelby County v. Holder. At issue in this case is whether the decision made by Congress in 2006 to reauthorise one portion of the Act in particular, Section 5, has exceeded its authority under the 14th and 15th amendments (equal protection and voting privileges), thereby violating the 10th amendment (state sovereignty) of the U.S.… [Read more]

“It’s a Sad Day for Conservatives,” a.k.a Good news for healthcare reform

The  attention-grabbing title, “I am very disappointed in Governor Rick Scott” was enough to let me know that I would soon have something to smile about. Red State’s Eric Erickson’s morning e-newsletter said the following:

I was one of the few national conservatives to support Governor Scott in 2010 during his primary. He is a fundamentally great person.[Read more]

Dummy’s Guide to Understanding Stem Cell Transplants

Stem cell research has appeared on the front pages once again. This week, the US Supreme Court announced that they have rejected an appeal that had been filed to block the government’s funding of stem cell research so that the research can proceed. The court refused to hear an appeal from scientists who have been challenging the federal funding for stem cell research — which is used with the hope that the cells will enable scientists to find cures for spinal cord injuries and Parkinson’s disease — on the grounds that it was violating a law that prohibits taxpayer financing for work that harms embryos.… [Read more]

The Supreme Court, Its Relation To The Election, and You

The Supreme Court started a new term this week and it is being argued that this may in fact be one of the most important sessions in over 60 years. After a three-month recess which began after the last session upheld the Affordable Care Act — which included the divisive Individual Mandate — the Supreme Court has released its list of potential cases.… [Read more]

Our Herculean President

We loyal lefties have had to endure some hits this go around. From the ACA (“ObamaCare”) without a public option, to necessary bank bailouts with no strings attached, to continued wholesale tax giveaways for the rich and corporate welfare for Exxon/Mobil and the like, to watered down legislation of all varieties, it hasn’t been a perfect ride.… [Read more]

Citizens United Continues to Undermine Our Once Democratic Election Process

The 2010 Supreme Court ruling in favor of Citizens United against the Federal Election Commission has certainly been controversial. Those in favor of the ruling simply argue the ruling is a victory for freedom of speech and the freedom to raise unlimited campaign funds. The fact that unions, non-profits, and corporations are now viewed as ‘citizens’ has critics of the ruling up in arms.… [Read more]

Professor Antonin Scalia: Judicial Independence 101

In the midst of the gloom expressed over the continued moribund state of the American economy, it heartened yer obedient scribe to see that even a 76 year old, life appointed US Supreme Court justice can rock his inner capitalist and push publishing royalties with the best of them. Hollywood celeb tell-alls, the Harry Potter franchise, Da Vinci Code hilarity, and (forthcoming) the wit and wisdom of Nancy Grace, certain contender for the world’s thinnest book award – step aside!… [Read more]

“Just doing our job” – for once

The torrent of Obamacare emotion that cascaded northwards across the border last Thursday is an intriguing phenomenon for this Canadian observer. We embraced the benefits of universal health care long ago, and in a series of occasional articles on what is now cast as the crucial U.S. election issue for 2012, I will attempt to assist the citizens of the Great Republic in their better understanding of the Canadian medical health insurance system.… [Read more]

Wrap It Up, July 1, 2012

We started the week with a simple question: “Where’s the humanity?” What made us think about this was an article from an overseas newspaper that reported a man died because of the lack of access to health care — caused, in part, by policy. We found ourselves understanding that processes and procedures allow organisations to run more efficiently, but when those same means of operational effectiveness result in loss of life, all for the sake of following codes, then those procedures should be re-evaluated.… [Read more]